Other Two-Seedline Papers

From the 1894, 9th edition of The Encyclopædia Britannica, vol. 11 of 25, pp. 674-675, under the subtitle “Herod”, we read (edited to improve understanding):

If you have a King James Version Bible with the proper center reference, you can very readily prove Two Seedline teaching with it, for it will take you from one supporting verse of Scripture to another almost endlessly on the subject. Not that the KJV is an especially advisable Bible to use for study, as it is alleged to contain approximately 27,000 translation mistakes.

Should one neglect to identify the Biblical “beast of the field” as being the “devil”, one is inviting one’s son, daughter, grandson, or granddaughter to take one as an intimate companion (and a terrible misfit at that)! A “misfit”, as an entity, is one not suited to his position or associates; a maladjusted alien unfit for companionship.

There is a scheme going on today to demonize anyone who would use the term “black” in Latin (i.e., nig´er...

As we make our way through Philip Jones’ book with the above title, we (myself and the reader) will find ourselves at variance with some of his faulty premises. Philip is a researcher and scholar par excellence, but he has picked up some excess baggage somewhere along the way. Philip may have read the 1970 book God’s Law...

At the end of paper #2 of this series, it was shown from the Aramaic Targum pseudo-Jonathan that it was not a negro who seduced Eve, but the fallen angel Sammael, at Genesis 4:1:

At the end of paper #2 of this series, it was shown from the Aramaic Targum pseudo-Jonathan that it was not a negro who seduced Eve, but the fallen angel Sammael, at Genesis 4:1!

At the beginning of this series of papers, I did not explain fully my decision to critique the work of Philip Jones, which I will now reveal in greater detail:

As I was proceeding with my constructive criticism through Jones’ book, I arrived at the end of page 29 and discovered that pages 30 and 31 were missing. So the reader will understand, several years ago Philip xeroxed his book (evidently selling out all of the books he had printed up) and voluntarily gave me a xeroxed copy of this work.

A better question might be: Biblical Canaanites, who are they today? Many are acquainted with the term as used in the Old Testament, and a few occasions in the New, but do they still exist today? And if so, how would we recognize one if we were to meet one of them? The first mention of “Canaan” in Scripture is at Gen. 9:18, as a person. We have to be careful, though, using this designation, as at various times it can mean different...

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